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Posts Tagged ‘KEA’

This Blog Is Moving

As many of you know, we’ve renovated our kealliance.org website and we’ve migrated this blog over to its new, permanent location at kealliance.org/blog.  We’re still working out the kinks, and we’ll still post at both site for the next week or so, but we hope to complete the transition soon.

We encourage you to point your browsers and update your feeds to the new location. Also, if you like having the posts delivered to you via email, you’ll need to re-subscribe to the new blog. The subscription box is at the very bottom of our homepage. Thanks for bearing with us on this, but we think it’ll be much better for all of us at the new site.

 

 

 

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It’s the end of 2011 and so we take quantitative stock of what we’ve accomplished in the last 52 weeks. The following are the most-viewed blog posts of 2011, which are actually quite representative of the issue work we’ve done over the last year. When it comes to North Idaho conservation controversies, from Bonner County craziness to messes in the Coeur d’Alene basin, from Tubbs Hill trails to the trees on the Dike Road, you can count on KEA to be in the middle of it.

For 10th place, remarkably, an exact tie:

10. the heartwarming Homeless Osprey Homeless No More and less heartwarming  The Sacketts’ Wetland Mapped

The rest of the top 10:

9. Coeur d’Alene City Council Signals Stronger Stand on Dike Road Trees

8. Bonner County Approves Priest Lake Subdivision

7. New “Property Rights Council” Brings Messy Ideological Extremism to Bonner County Government

6. New Mini-Megaloads Proposed To Be Routed Through Coeur d’Alene on Hwy 95

5. Wheelchairs on Tubbs Hill

4. Coeur d’Alene Basin Pipeline Spill?

3. January Flooding May Have Caused the Worst Coeur d’Alene Basin Contamination in Years

2. What The Priest Lake Wetland Case Is Actually About

And not that surprisingly, out top post for 2011 is:

1. Saving the Dike Road Trees   

But in an important footnote, it turns out that the blog post that actually got the most hits in 2011 dates from December 2009 and is therefore disqualified from this end-of-year list.  Showing the immense power of search engines, our timelessly informative posting about the legal status of Woodsy the Owl remains undefeated — the article, “The owl is required to be fanciful and must wear slacks,” and consequent downloads of the ridiculous public-domain illustration of Woodsy Owl, again got more views in 2011 than any other KEA blog post. However, for whatever reason, the search engines stopped sending so much Woodsy Owl traffic in mid-summer. Evidently, some other web presence (Wikipedia, we think) is now the chief authority for all things Woodsy.

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A generous member has offered to match end-of-year contributions to KEA, dollar for dollar, up to $5000. For the next week, your donation goes twice as far. So here are the top ten reasons why you should click over to our nice new website and donate today.

1. Tubbs Hill and Cougar Bay. KEA is the leading defender of our local jewels. This past year we defended Tubbs Hill from unnecessary intrusion and we saved Cougar Bay for habitat and quiet wake-free recreation.

2. Who else will save the Dike Road Trees?

3. 40 years. We’re the oldest non-profit conservation organization in the State of Idaho. Next year, 2012, will mark our 40th anniversary. Help us kick off the next 40 years.

4. Tax deduction. We sometimes forget to remind people, but we are a charity organized under section 501(c)(3) of the IRS code, which means your donations to KEA are tax deductible. And tax season is coming up.

5. Board and Staff. We got a truly talented and dedicated team, and we’re really good at what we do.

6. Who else is calling out the nonsense in Bonner County?

7. Community Roots. Our successful local food program is expanding every year. Our first-in-the-region charitable CSA, and our local food share system are delivering local fresh food to families who need it.

8. Effective and Efficient. We are, out of budget necessity, a scrappy, low-overhead, grassroots, volunteer-dependent organization. Very little of our budget earmarked for fundraising expenditures and we hope to keep it that way.

9. We do the work so you don’t have to. There are so many meetings, hearings, and events to attend. There is so much research to do, comments to write, and phone calls to make.  As the grassroots community voice for all things conservation in North Idaho, we are tireless, principled, and wholly dedicated to our mission “to conserve, protect and restore the environment in North Idaho.” Because that’s what you’d expect.

10.   Our community depends on us, but we depend on you. Our natural and scenic environment and our beautiful sense of community is what makes this such a great place. It is all very much worth defending.  As you consider your end-of-year contributions, consider giving generously to KEA.

 

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The one thing we know all too well in our small office, we can’t do what we do without community support. And we have a remarkable community we have in North Idaho. This Thanksgiving holiday, we’d like to point out some of the ways that people have come together this year to make our great region even greater.

With an outpouring of support from paddlers, anglers, and local residents, we were successful in securing more permanent protection of Cougar Bay on Coeur d’Alene Lake for wildlife and quiet recreation. Community members and KEA pitched in with Kootenai County Parks and Waterways to better delineate a no-wake zone across the bay while protecting many of the historic pilings for osprey habitat.

KEA and community members rallied – as we always do – to protect Tubbs Hill from unnecessary intrusion, but we also worked cooperatively to create new opportunities for wheelchair access to Coeur d’Alene’s amazing natural amenity. Currently, KEA is working with literally thousands of local residents who want to protect the trees along the dike road and who oppose the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decision calling for their removal.

This past summer, community members joined us at KEA in launching the region’s first “floating treatment wetland” in a pond above Hayden Lake in a demonstration pilot project to restore water quality. If our water monitoring shows success, these wetlands may be employed along docks and shorelines to help clean up Lakes and other waters throughout North Idaho.

Beyond traditional conservation and restoration, our volunteer-fueled Community Roots local food program just completed another great growing season. Thousands of pounds of local fresh food from backyard gardeners and local farms were distributed to food assistance facilities throughout Coeur d’Alene through our Local Food Share program. A good portion of the shared food was harvested in the Shared Harvest Community Garden at 10th and Foster, which completed its third successful volunteer summer. And our unique Roots CSA completed another successful year in Dalton Gardens, helping to make community supported agriculture subscriptions available to low-income members of our community.

We point all of this success out to make a broader point. There will always be lakes and waterways to clean up, landscapes and resources to be protected and, unfortunately, people in our community who will be hungry.  In that sense, our work is ongoing and endless. But what makes it most rewarding for us at KEA is our community’s capacity for making things better.  With every year, with every project, and with every challenge, people in North Idaho step up and help out. Ours is a great community. And for this, this Thanksgiving, we give our sincere thanks.

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I’m pretty sure that if you’re reading this blog post, you’re doing so with a reasonably operable computer. (Or you know someone with a reasonably operable computer who prints out the KEA Blog posts for you.)

You can probably also guess that we are also using computers to write these posts and place them on the internets for your perusal. What you might not know, however, is that the computers in our KEA offices are increasingly less operable. Or, decreasingly operable, if you prefer. Either way, they’re making noises and giving us error messages that we don’t understand except to back up our work to “the cloud” every couple of minutes. We’re afraid that they’re one minor power surge away from being e-waste.

Anyway.  We’re letting you know this insider information in the off chance that you have a computer that is definitely operable that you could donate to KEA. We need to run office stuff and database stuff and internet stuff, so it needs to have some sufficiently modern amenities. If you don’t have a computer, we have set up a “buy KEA a new computer” account for online donations. Assuming, of course, we can still get online to process them.

While at least one of the computers is still working, here’s thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

 

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This Thursday, noon, at the Iron Horse, we’ll have an update briefing on the Corps of Engineers death sentence for the dike road trees. Coeur d’Alene City Councilman John Bruning will give an update from the City’s perspective, including a discussion of a new ad hoc committee being formed.  And Terry Harris from KEA will give an update on what is becoming an extraordinary campaign to save the trees. (Here’s the online petition, by the way)

The briefing will mark the fall-season kick-off of the 39th consecutive year of regularly-scheduled general informational meetings at the Iron Horse by Kootenai Environmental Alliance, the oldest non-profit conservation organization in Idaho.

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Korrine Kreilkamp, our Community Roots founder, organizer, and local-food all-around all-star has been invited to the prestigious Patagonia Tools for Grassroots Activists Conference this fall at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. The invitation-only conference is an extraordinary training opportunity for young grassroots organizers from across the country, and we’re incredibly proud that Korrine got an invitation. Patagonia – the great outdoors retailer, wonderful corporate citizen, and a very generous supporter of KEA in past years – picks up the tab for training and room and board, but we need to get Korrine to Tahoe.

This, of course, is the kind of opportunity that we didn’t budget for but that is also way too good to pass up. So we need your help. We’d like to raise about $500 to pay for airfare, travel expenses, and have a little left over so that we can implement whatever Korrine learns on her trip. An anonymous donor has offered to donate the final $100 if we raise the other $400 on-line.

So, help us send Korrine to camp! Click on the button to donate $10, $25, $50, $100 or more (pay pal or credit cards accepted through pay pal) toward this great investment.

UPDATE: 8/29 4:00 pm:  A great response, but still a ways to go

UPDATE: 8/30 9:00 am: More than half way to meeting the match!

UPDATE: 9/1 9:00 am: We made the match! Thanks everyone!

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